5 December 2016

Classroom Technology Analysis: Example

In the latest module of my Masters in Education and Instructional Technology, we studied "Administration of Technology Initiatives: Planning, Budgeting, and Evaluation". This involved us exploring how to research and write for grants, as well as design and plan at both classroom and school initiative level. As many schools are implementing technology into their curriculum, it is important that a thorough investigation take place in order to determine the true learning needs of the community. Below is an example of a hypothetical report; it demonstrates both the layout and the level of detail required to ascertain the needs of a particular classroom.

The structure of the needs analysis includes a classroom description and a statement of academic need, which is crucial in being able to hone a helpful vision statement that supports tightly focused goals, objectives, and professional development requirements. Budgets for both training and equipment are outlined, along with a realistic timeline for successful implementation of the outcomes of the needs analysis.
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Classroom Description

I am Head of Media Studies in a large international school in the Middle East. It is located within the walls of a gated township of approximately 10,000 people, on the east coast of Qatar, 80km from the nearest city, Doha. It is the only English-medium school outside of Doha and exists entirely for members of the gated township, which, in itself, exists solely for the employees of a large oil and gas company.

We are K12 and offer a British Curriculum to a population of less than 10% of British or native-English speaking families. The majority of children are of Philippino heritage, followed closely by Indian, Indonesian, Malaysian and Pakistani, as well as Arabs from both Qatar and the surrounding Gulf region. The curriculum is delivered in English, though this is the second, third or even fourth language of the majority of learners. There is no provision for English as an Additional Language (EAL) or Support for Learning (SfL), and there are no formal entry requirements to the school, other than the father having a contract with the company.

The school has been in existence for 60 years and, over time, has grown exponentially. There are currently over 1500 learners on roll but the school infrastructure has not increased inline with this growth. There is one newish purpose-built building, housing a main gym hall encircled by four science and four ICT labs, but the rest of the school comprises either converted accommodation blocks or prefabricated ‘temporary’ huts. The buildings sprawl over a site of approximately one square mile and walking between them is done in the open air, which is unbearable in the summer and autumn months due to average temperatures of 100-120°C. This also means that a laptop trolley system is impossible. Each cluster of huts equates to a ‘block’ and is dedicated to a particular subject. My subject, Media Studies, has been newly introduced to the school and is offered to Grades 11 and 12. As a result, the department has been placed into the Sixth Form block, which comprises eight small rooms dedicated to Grades 11 and 12. My room measures approximately 23ft2.

Generally, technology is extremely limited within the school. Learners have a one-hour ICT lesson per week in dedicated labs and are banned from bringing any digital device on site. Internet access is extremely controlled and even the USB hubs are disabled on student PCs. I am provided with:
  • a desktop PC connected to the Internet and company network, 
  • an overhead projector (doesn’t work), 
  • a DVD player, 
  • a 42” colour television, and
  • an old video camera.
All networked PCs in the school have rigorous filters that block anything deem related to ‘sharing’ or ‘social media’. I only use my PC for accessing the student record database and for printing via the network. I connect my personal MacBook Air to the television and use it as a projector along with my WIFI access, which permits me to share learning via Edmodo (Edmodo, 2008) and Google Apps (Google, Inc., 2012). Neither of these are officially ‘authorised’ by the school. The company owns a site licence for Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection 5.5 (Adobe Systems, 2011), which, whilst being an older version, is still perfectly suited for all our creative needs. However, we cannot run the film-editing software, Premiere Pro (Adobe Systems, 2016) or After Effects (Adobe Systems, 2016), which is exactly what we require for the film-making coursework element, as the programme requires 64-bit processing and our PCs are only 32-bit. Theoretically, one hundred percent of learners should have Internet access at home, as all employees reside in company-provided accommodation, all of which has broadband installation. However, actual access to this can be very restricted dependent on the religious or other beliefs of the parents. Equally problematic is contact with actual devices, as many families have five or more children.

The Media Studies course[1] (Cambridge International Examinations, 2016) is offered over either one or two years. The one year AS-Level course can be completed as a stand-alone course but is prerequisite, with a minimum grade D, for entry into the second year A2-Level course. Generally, to be granted access to the AS programmes offered to Grades 11 and 12, learners must have gained a grade B or above in the relevant subject at GCSE[2]. There is no Media Studies GCSE however, and so learners have been able to enter the AS course with no prerequisite grades. This has been problematic because it is an intensive interdisciplinary and analytical course; I believe it is essential that learners should possess a minimum of a grade C in GCSE English, whilst good grades in other related subjects, including Art, Graphics, ICT, Psychology, and English Literature, would also be beneficial. My AS Level cohort this year, comprised 45% who did not pass English as a Second Language and who had no background in analytical reading or writing. Last year, the AS learners who gained the requisite D grade to be permitted to continue into the second year A2 course, was 55%. Current pass rates[3] at A*-C stand at 45% in the first year AS, and 65% in the second year A2 course.

Statement of Academic Need

The nature of the Media Studies course is extremely reliant on the use of technology for both the provision of teaching and as evidence of learning. As a department, the school needs to help us work towards designing and delivering “transformational learning experiences enabled by technology” (Office of Educational Technology, 2016) that culminate in improved grades for all learners.

Media Studies students are required to create films, design posters, build websites, and maintain blogs as their coursework portfolios. They must have access to appropriate and up-to-date technological devices, including DSLR cameras and accessories, along with computers that can run the Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection (Adobe Systems, 2011). In addition, we need an unfiltered Internet connection including, particularly, YouTube (YouTube, LLC., 2005), web-authoring sites such as Wix (NASDQ.WIX, 2006), Weebly (Weebly, Inc., 2006), and Google Sites (Google Inc., 2008), and blogging applications like Blogger (Google, Inc., 1999), WordPress (WordPress Foundation, 2003) and Tumblr (Yahoo, Inc., 2007). Alternatively, or ideally in conjunction with the above, we should implement a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programme, where learners are granted WIFI access on their own devices. In the majority, my learners are EAL; I believe technology and BYOD programmes “can support students with a variety of learning needs” (King-Sears, 2009). They can use Google Translate (Google, Inc., 2006), deemed as “one of the best translation apps available” (Posey, 2014) offering “103 languages” (Google, Inc., 2006), which can support their language accuracy. Apps such as Read and Write (Texthelp Ltd), an “assistive learning software that supports students' literacy needs at every stage of their educational journey”, provides “a big confidence booster for English Language Learners” (Texthelp Ltd). It has a “friendly, intuitive toolbar that assists students” by “reading text out loud, understanding unfamiliar words, researching assignments and proofing written work”, all of which will help my learners improve their coursework blog posts independently. At the moment, many hand-write them, I proof their work, then they type it up. Using Read and Write[4] will allow them to take control and improve their communication and clarity, as well as reduce the time taken to post. If technology is implemented soundly and carefully, with the above measures, it can provide “learning experiences that provide the right tools and supports for all learners to thrive” (US Department of Education, 2016) along with the opportunity to complete their coursework effectively and successfully.

Vision Statement

Media Studies is a steep learning curve and necessitates the use of technology by every student for their success in the course through individual portfolio submissions. Its very nature allows learners authentic opportunities to solve problems, collaborate, manage demanding projects and people, and meet deadlines. The exposure to a variety of technical skills – filming, editing, special effects, digital design for use in print and online, web authoring and use of social media – provides essential real-world proficiencies in preparation for jobs that may not yet exist, presenting opportunities in learning how to “organize and direct their own learning for the rest of their lives” (US Department of Education, 2016). Increased appropriate technology will provide authentic exposure to industry-standard software on state-of-the-art machines. It will permit me to deliver learning more effectively, increasing connection with experts in the relevant fields, and preventing valuable ‘teachable moments’ from being missed out on, when I am unable to search for and show relevant film clips or tutorials on YouTube (YouTube, LLC., 2005). I will be able to demonstrate and model building websites, creating graphic designs, editing footage and adding special effects, and my learners will be able to create and experiment IN the classroom WITH my support, rather than have to struggle at home and try to explain issues that cannot presently be resolved synchronously in the classroom.

In short, I want to look beyond using technology as a way to “increase student engagement and interest” (Bebell & O'Dwyer, 2010) and work towards being able to “leverage digital technologies to personalize learning” (Schwartz, 2013). Ultimately, I want lessons to be “incubators of exploration and invention” where I raise both the pass rates and cultivate in learners with a “base of knowledge and abilities that can be augmented and enhanced throughout [their] lives” (US Department of Education, 2016).

Goal and Objectives

GOAL: Provision of appropriate technology that will allow the Media Studies department to “work smarter, not harder" (See, 1992) and improve the final grades of Media Studies learners.

  • Objective 1: The Media Studies lab will be equipped with hardware that will allow learners to complete their portfolios successfully, improving grades by 15% within the first year of implementation.
  • Objective 2: The Media Studies lab will be equipped with software that will allow learners to complete their portfolios successfully, improving grades by 15% within the first year of implementation.
  • Objective 3: The Media Studies lab will have improved accessibility to relevant programmes and apps, including unfiltered access to the Internet, that will allow learners to complete their portfolios successfully, improving grades by 15% within the first year of implementation.
  • Objective 4: Improved technology provision and access in The Media Studies lab will raise the retention level of learners continuing from AS to A2, by increasing the attainment of a grade D to 60% in the AS Level course.

Evaluation

Objective
Evaluation
1
to equip the media classroom with appropriate hardware
·       Order and take possession of relevant equipment to be available for all learners, so that not just those who can afford their own are able to pass the course, e.g. iMacs, DSLR cameras, tripods, dolly, shotgun microphones etc.
·       Set up a booking system to monitor usage and budget accordingly for subsequent years
·       Provide training tutorials in extra-curricular time, so that learners are able to use software appropriately and effectively
·       Set up lunchtime workshops for learners to use media lab with support from staff
2
to equip the media classroom with appropriate software
·       With upgraded machines, the Adobe Master Collection can be installed for learners to be able to edit and create special effects (Premiere Pro and After Effects)
·       Provide training tutorials in extra-curricular time, so that learners are able to use software appropriately and effectively
·       Set up lunchtime workshops for learners to use media lab with support from staff
3
to improve accessibility to relevant programmes and apps
·       Work with the tech department towards enabling improved and appropriate access
·       Write and put into place relevant AUPs to support safe and responsible usage
·       Monitor usage on a termly basis
·       Set up lunchtime workshops for learners to use media lab with support from staff
4
increase grade D attainment in AS and raise retention level into A2
·       Implement and monitor above measures regarding hardware, software and accessibility
·       Monitor and revise accordingly, on a termly basis
·       Use Word Processing software to support EAL
·       Work closely with the English department to begin cross-transference of language and analytical skills at an early point in the educational career of the learners

The current grades are reflective of the fact that learners do not have access to appropriate software, hardware or Internet access, all of which are crucial for success in this course. The most “effective technology plans focus on applications, not technology” (See, 1992) and our current technology is insufficient to support true success or improve grades to the extent outlined in the objectives. Of the existing technology available (listed on pages 4 and 5), the following can be used to meet the goals and objectives stated above:
  • a DVD player
  • a 42” colour television
  • an old video camera
  • personal MacBook
  • staff WIFI connection
  • personal Google Apps and Edmodo accounts
As I can continue to deliver my lessons via Edmodo and Google Sites using my laptop and the TV as a projector. However, to meet the academic needs, the department will also require the following hardware:
  • Apple iMacs
  • DSLR cameras & SD cards
  • tripods
  • dolly
  • microphones
In addition, the following software and access is also required:
  • Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection
  • Unfiltered Internet provision with access to:
    • Video-sharing sites: YouTube, Vimeo
    • Web-Authoring sites: Wix, Weebly, Google Sites
    • Blogging sites: Blogger, WordPress, Tumblr

Budget and Implementation

At both AS and A2 Level, learners must create and maintain a multi-media blog that charts the progression of their Media Studies journey. On it, they have to embed all learning: videos, storyboards, screenplays, projects and graphics that they produce throughout the course, with detailed explanations of what they have learned and how this contributes to the skills and knowledge the need for their final products. They require access to blogging sites in order to complete this, but at present, are unable to so so in school due to the filtering system. For many in the AS course, this is their first exposure to digital publishing and need a great deal of support in both setting up their blog and maintaining it to a level that will constitute a successful grade. In A2, learners are more adept at blogging but want to have choice in their platform to develop their skills and customise their blogs more. As the blog constitutes the entirety of their coursework, it is crucial that, as a teacher, I am able to work on developing the necessary skills in school with them and be able to support them in creating their portfolio.

Both courses require the creation of a film; “learning the grammar of video production is the next basic skill after learning to read and write” (See, 1992) and the equipment listed above is necessary to develop the requisite media literacy for this course. In the A2 course, learners must produce a two-minute opening to an original film, adhering to the conventions of both title credits and the genre of their choosing. In A2, learners are given a choice between creating either a music video, a short film, a documentary extract, or two trailers. Media Studies classes are small, with a maximum of ten, meaning the quantities of hardware stated in the budget will equate to one camera, tripod, microphone, etc. between two. At present, all learners share access to only one camera and have to rely on friend’s or family’s equipment if it is being used by another learner. Adding more equipment will mean an increased opportunity for all learners, and particularly those without personal devices, to be able to film and edit using professional-style equipment and provide optimal chance of success. 

Budget Estimate

Description
Cost
Quantity
Total
 $504.95
5
 $2,524.75
 $19.97
10
 $199.70
 $299.00
5
 $1,495.00
 $199.88
5
 $999.40
 $39.99
2
 $79.98
 $2,199.00
2
 $4,398.00
27-inch iMac with Retina 5K display
4.0GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 4.2GHz
32GB 1867MHz DDR3 SDRAM - four 8GB
2TB Fusion Drive
AMD Radeon R9 M395X with 4GB video memory
Magic Trackpad 2
Magic Keyboard (English) & User’s Guide

Accessory Kit
 $3,449.00
3
 $10,347.00
Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection 5.5
 $-  
0
 $-  
YouTube, Vimeo access
 $-  
0
 $-  
Web-Authoring Software (Wix, Weebly, Google)
 $-  
0
 $-  
Blogging Software (Blogger, WordPress, Tumblr)
 $-  
0
 $-  
Total
$20,043.83

In addition to the film product, the AS Level course requires learners to design and produce a promotional package including both print and website elements. They must create posters or postcards, as well as a website that complements their film product. At present, learners do not have access to web-authoring software such as Wix (NASDQ.WIX, 2006), Weebly (Weebly, Inc., 2006), or Google Sites (Google Inc., 2008) in school. This means, they have to work at home without the necessary support from myself or each other. The Adobe Creative Suite includes Photoshop (Adobe Systems, 1990), InDesign (Adobe Systems, 2015) and Illustrator (Adobe Systems, 1987), again, all industry-standard products that will provide expertise in authentic programmes and allow creation of high quality products. At present, the school PCs run these applications but they are in the ICT laboratories, of which there are only four. All ICT lessons, for Grades 4-13 take place in these labs and there are no available slots during Media Studies lessons. As a result, learners are utilising online sites, such as Canva (Canva, 2012) and Paint.NET (dotPDN, LLC., 2004), at home, to create their work. Finally, both cohorts must include a multi-media creative critical reflection. “Using digital formats”, they must reflect on and evaluate their own productions with reference to essential areas of media understanding, emphasis being on the “creative use of such tools” (Cambridge International Examinations, 2016). Unfiltered access to such sites in school, will allow lessons to offer support in developing the necessary skills that support the creation of a successful portfolio.

Five Apple iMacs have been selected as industry-standard machines that learners will encounter should they continue in their media careers; three are 21.5” and two are 27” and all are top-spec, so they will be current and workable for as long as possible, be able to deal with the demands of running the Adobe Creative Suite and capable of storing large media files. The order includes both Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad to provide flexible working arrangements that are best suited to task and learner. The 21.5” machines are perfect for all tasks, such as the print and web-design elements, whilst the 27” machines are particularly suited to editing and special effects using Premiere Pro and After Effects.

Objective
Equipment
Implementation
1
to equip the media classroom with appropriate hardware
·       Apple iMacs
·       DSLR cameras & SD cards
·       tripods
·       dollies
·       microphones
·       Film Tasks:
o   Film-opening task (AS)
o   Two trailers (A2)
o   Music Video (A2)
o   Documentary Extract (A2)
o   Short Film (A2)
·       Print Products:
o   Poster (A2)
o   Postcard (A2)
·       General teaching, learning and research
2
to equip the media classroom with appropriate software
·       Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection
o   Premiere Pro
o   After Effects
o   InDesign
o   Photoshop
o   Illustrator
·       Film Tasks:
o   Film-opening task (AS)
o   Two trailers (A2)
o   Music Video (A2)
o   Documentary Extract (A2)
o   Short Film (A2)
·       Print Products:
o   Poster (A2)
o   Postcard (A2)
3
to improve accessibility to relevant programmes and apps
·       Unfiltered Internet provision with access to:
o  Video-sharing sites: YouTube, Vimeo
o  Web-Authoring sites: Wix, Weebly, Google Sites
o  Blogging sites: Blogger, WordPress, Tumblr
·       Film Tasks:
o   Film-opening task (AS)
o   Two trailers (A2)
o   Music Video (A2)
o   Documentary Extract (A2)
o   Short Film (A2)
·       Print Products:
o   Poster (A2)
o   Postcard (A2)
·       Web Products (A2)
·       Portfolio Blog (AS & A2)
·       Creative Critical Reflection (AS & A2)
·       General teaching, learning and research
4
increase grade D attainment in AS and raise retention level into A2
All of the above.
As outlined above.

According to the Media Studies syllabus, learners must be able to “plan and construct media products using appropriate technical and creative skills” (Cambridge International Examinations, 2016). Without fitting and relevant technology, achieving this assessment objective is highly challenging, and the poor results are testament to the struggle faced by learners in the current climate of technology in our school. I believe that grades will improve inline with improved technology.

Professional Development

Learners who are involved in “video production become involved in cooperative grouping, teamwork, planning, research, writing, visual literacy activities, and many higher order thinking activities” (See, 1992); future plans should foresee growth of a well-resourced department run by experts who are able and willing to share both equipment and skills with the school community. In turn, this will provide valuable film-making exposure to learners earlier on in their educational career. In analysing film, leaners “process words and ideas”; children who are exposed to this subject will become more knowledgeable in reading film and “able to process information at the pace it is presented” (Anderson & Collins, 1988), which is at an elevated rate to processing the written word, of which they have plenty of exposure. This means they will be better prepared for the examination course and results should improve concurrently. Consequently, professional development should initiate within the Media department, with knowledge then cascaded to other departments in all-school professional learning sessions.

To be effective, professional learning has to be flexible. A useful option for busy teachers are MOOCs. Future Learn (The Open Univiersity, 2012) offers an exceptional range of filmmaking courses that are delivered by top universities. Their ‘Get into Filmmaking’ collection offers a seven-course programme covering all essentials and includes plenty of resources and lessons ideas that can be implemented immediately. The beauty of MOOCs is that they are online and can be completed at a pace suited to each individual. Along with providing time to complete courses within dedicated and timetabled professional learning sessions in school, offering teachers the option of flexible and supported learning is a great way of ensuring staff are not overburdened and are able to complete training that is pertinent and relevant to their individual needs. In addition, many MOOCs are free, as are the Future Learn courses mentioned above, with the option of purchasing a certificate or statement of completion for a small fee. Locally, there are some relevant courses offered by the Al Jazeera Training Centre, such as evening Diplomas in ‘TV Filming and Montage’ or ‘Documentary Filmmaking’, as well as four-day courses in the Adobe applications necessary for successful completion of coursework, such as ‘Introduction to Illustrator’, ‘Introduction to Premiere Pro’, and ‘InDesign Fundamentals’ (Al Jazeera Media Network, 2016). In addition, the New York Film Academy (New York Film Academy, 2016) offers an intensive four week HD filmmaking workshop each spring break[5]. 

Professional Development Budget

Description
Cost
Quantity
Total
 $-  
1
 $-  
 $5,490.00
1
 $5,490.00
 $5,490.00
1
 $5,490.00
 $1,098.00
1
 $1,098.00
 $1,098.00
1
 $1,098.00
 $1,098.00
1
 $1,098.00
Total
$14,274.00

As a school, we need to let staff and students “understand how technology can be a tool that makes them a more productive and powerful person”, and move away from teaching “about technology in isolation from other subject areas” (See, 1992). Media Studies offers the chance for students to develop proficiencies that are essential in being able to “deal effectively with information in the future” (See, 1992) and offers critical transferable skills that can be integrated across the curriculum. I envisage the Media department becoming a hub that can offer support to teachers and subjects such as ICT, Graphic Design, Art, English, and Drama. I would like my well-trained and well-resourced team the chance to cascade professional learning to other departments and share expertise across the community.

Timeline

Implementation of this plan will cover a two-year period. In the first year, Media Studies staff will embark upon training as mentioned above, as pertinent to both their personal needs and to complement the proficiencies of the department as a whole. Orders are finalised and approved in February of Term 2 in the first year for delivery in Term 3 and over the summer break ready for use in Year 2. Orientation of the new equipment takes place over the summer and during the planning and preparation week held at the beginning of Term 1 of Year 2. Media staff should introduce Training Tutorials for students in use of the new hardware and software in Terms 1 & 2 of Year 2, as well as provide open access to the Media lab during lunch breaks. This should be staffed on a rotational basis by the department.

Two-Year Timeline

Year 1
Summer Break      Jul-Aug
Year 2
Term 1 Sep-Dec
Term 2 Jan-Apr
Term 3 Apr-Jun
Term 1 Sep-Dec
Term 2 Jan-Apr
Term 3 Apr-Jun
Place orders







Training: Media staff







Interdisciplinary Meets







Receipt of order







Media staff orientation







Training Tutorials







Media Lab open-access







Departmental Meetings







Professional Learning







Monitor usage







Monitor grades








Interdisciplinary meetings between related subjects should commence in Term 3 of Year 2 to ‘set the ball rolling’; departments should meet again in Term 2 of Year 2 to further plan and implement interdisciplinary units of work. Media Studies departmental meetings should be held in scheduled sessions and focus on the implementation of this plan throughout the two-year period. In Year 1, the emphasis should be on training and disseminating learning to all staff, along with working towards interdisciplinary unit planning. This should continue to build into Year 2, in conjunction with sessions dedicated to monitoring and revision of use of both the technology, student achievement, and cross-curricular implementation, to ensure relevance and adherence with the intended goals and objectives of this technology plan.

References

Adobe Systems. (1987). Adobe Illustrator. Vector Graphics Editor.
Adobe Systems. (1990). Adobe Photoshop. Raster Graphics Editor.
Adobe Systems. (2011, April). Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection 5.5. Computer Software Programme.
Adobe Systems. (2015). Adobe InDesign. Desktop Publishing.
Adobe Systems. (2016). Adobe After Effects. Visual effects, Motion graphics, Compositing, Computer 
animation.
Adobe Systems. (2016). Adobe Premiere Pro. Video Editing Software.
Al Jazeera Media Network. (2016). Retrieved June 22, 2016, from Al Jazeera Media and Training Centre: http://training.aljazeera.net/en/
Anderson, D., & Collins, P. (1988). The Impact on Children’s Education: Television’s Influence on Cognitive Development. U.S. Office of Educational Research and Improvement.
Bebell, D., & O'Dwyer, L. M. (2010). Educational outcomes and research from 1:1 computing settings. Journal of Technology, Learning, and Assessment, 9(1).
Cambridge International Examinations. (2016). Media Studies . 9607 Syllabus 2016.
Canva. (2012). Canva. Design software.
dotPDN, LLC. (2004). Paint.NET. Raster graphics editor (freeware).
Edmodo. (2008). Edmodo. Social learning network, Social learning tools, Networked learning.
Google Inc. (2008). Google Sites. Web Authoring Internet Application.
Google, Inc. (1999). Blogger. Blog host.
Google, Inc. (2006). Google Translate. Statistical machine translation.
Google, Inc. (2012). Google Apps for Education. Web productivity tools.
King-Sears, M. (2009). Universal design for learning: Technology and pedagogy. Learning Disability Quarterly, 34(4), 199-201.
NASDQ.WIX. (2006). Wix.com. Web Authoring Internet Application.
New York Film Academy. (2016). New York Film Academy in Doha, Qatar. Retrieved June 22, 2016, from New Yor Film Academy: https://www.nyfa.edu/doha/
Office of Educational Technology. (2016). National Education Technology Plan. Retrieved June 14, 2016, from Office of Educational Technology: http://tech.ed.gov/netp/
Posey, B. (2014, May 27). Overcome the language barrier with these five free translation apps. Retrieved June 23, 2016, from Tech Republic: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/five-apps/overcome-the-language-barrier-with-these-five-free-translation-apps/
Schwartz, K. (2013, March 21). Internet Access for All: A New Program Targets Low-Income Students. Retrieved July 22, 2015, from KQED: http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/03/21/internet-access-for-everyone-a-new-program-targets-low-income-students/
See, J. (1992, May). Developing Effective Technology Plans. The Computing Teacher, 19(8).
Texthelp Ltd. (n.d.). Read and Write. 2015.
The Open Univiersity. (2012). Get Into Filmmaking. Retrieved June 22, 2016, from Future Learn: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/collections/filmmaking
US Department of Education. (2016). Future ready learning: Reimagining the role of technology in education. Office of Educational Technology. Office of Educational Technology.
Weebly, Inc. (2006). Weebly.com. Web Hosting Internet Application.
WordPress Foundation. (2003). WordPress. Blog software, Content Management System, Content Management Framework.
Yahoo, Inc. (2007). Tumblr. Microblogging, social networking service.
YouTube, LLC. (2005). YouTube. Internet Video hosting service.




[1] See Appendix for course structure
[2] General Certificate of Education. In the British system, learners typically study 7-10 GCSE subjects during Grades 9 and 10. These are two-year courses which are externally assessed by examinations which take place in the summer of Grade 10.
[3] This constitutes a ‘pass rate’ and the minimum requirement for access into university level.
[4] The cost for this is not included in the budget, as my school would not allow me to contact them for a quotation.
[5] Details about dates and prices have yet to be announced for the next academic year. There is uncertainty around availability and so, this is not included in the initial budget. It is something the department would look into in the future.